German occupation of Belgium during World War II | Wikipedia audio article

German occupation of Belgium during World War II | Wikipedia audio article

This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/German_occupation_of_Belgium_during_World_War_II

00:02:35 1 Background
00:04:11 2 Administration and governance
00:06:30 2.1 Leopold III
00:09:31 3 Life in occupied Belgium
00:10:50 3.1 Rationing
00:12:22 3.2 Allied bombing
00:14:39 4 Economic situation
00:15:52 4.1 Galopin Doctrine
00:17:30 4.2 Deportation and forced labour
00:19:09 5 Belgian prisoners of war
00:20:19 6 Repression
00:21:53 6.1 Persecution of Jews and the Holocaust
00:25:08 6.2 Political dissent
00:27:49 7 Collaboration
00:29:28 7.1 In Flanders
00:31:53 7.2 In Wallonia
00:34:11 8 Resistance
00:37:15 9 Liberation
00:39:12 10 See also

Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago.

Learning by listening is a great way to:
– increases imagination and understanding
– improves your listening skills
– improves your own spoken accent
– learn while on the move
– reduce eye strain

Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone.

Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio:
https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91
Other Wikipedia audio articles at:
https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts
Upload your own Wikipedia articles through:
https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts
Speaking Rate: 0.8762800409257281
Voice name: en-AU-Wavenet-B

“I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think.”
– Socrates

SUMMARY
=======
The German occupation of Belgium (French: Occupation allemande, Dutch: Duitse bezetting) during World War II began on 28 May 1940 when the Belgian army surrendered to German forces and lasted until Belgium’s liberation by the Western Allies between September 1944 and February 1945. It was the second time that Germany had occupied Belgium in under thirty years.
After the success of the invasion, a military administration was established in Belgium, bringing the territory under the direct rule of the Wehrmacht. Thousands of Belgian soldiers were taken as prisoners of war, and many were not released until 1945. The German administration juggled competing objectives of maintaining order while extracting material from the territory for the war effort. They were assisted by the Belgian civil service, which believed that limited co-operation with the occupiers would result in the least damage to Belgian interests. Belgian Fascist parties in both Flanders and Wallonia, established before the war, collaborated much more actively with the occupiers; they helped recruit Belgians for the German army and were given more power themselves toward the end of the occupation. Food and fuel were tightly rationed, and all official news was closely censored. Belgian civilians living near possible targets such as railway junctions were in danger of Allied aerial bombing.
From 1942, the occupation became more repressive. Jews suffered systematic persecution and deportation to concentration camps, as measures were taken against potential political opposition. Despite vigorous protest, the Germans deported Belgian civilians to work in factories in Germany. Meanwhile, the Belgian Resistance, formed in late 1940, expanded vastly. From 1944, the SS and Nazi Party gained much greater control in Belgium, particularly after the military government was replaced in July by a Nazi civil administration, the Reichskommissariat Belgien-Nordfrankreich. In September 1944, Allied forces arrived in Belgium and quickly moved across the country. That December, the territory was incorporated de jure into the Greater German Reich although its collaborationist leaders were already in exile in Germany and German control in the region was virtually non-existent. Belgium was declared fully liberated in February 1945. In total, 40,690 Belgians, over half of them Jews, were killed during the occupation and the country’s pre-war gross domestic product (GDP) was reduced by eight percent.
German occupation of Belgium during World War II | Wikipedia audio article